History of Basketball

Basketball on the Edge – The Legendary John Wooden on The Tony Robbins Podcast

Wooden

Whether you are a basketball coach, parent, or player, this podcast featuring Legendary UCLA Basketball Coach John Wooden is the quite simply the best piece of content I have ever shared with you via Basketball on the Edge.  The wisdom and knowledge that Coach Wooden shares during this interview will be unbelievably valuable to you whether you are a John Wooden fan or you know nothing at all about his remarkable life and career.  This interview took place 20 years ago and yet it still sounds completely fresh and relevant due to the fact that so much of modern coaching theory is based on the teachings of Coach Wooden.  Please take the time to listen to the entire interview and I truly believe you will come away with new insights to improve your life and the lives of those you touch on and off the court.

Click here to listen to The Legendary John Wooden on the Tony Robbins Podcast

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Basketball on the Edge – Dr. James Naismith’s 13 Original Rules of Basketball

Check out the 13 original rules of basketball written by Dr. James Naismith in 1891.  The game sure has changed!

  1. The ball may be thrown in any direction with one or both hands.
  2. The ball may be batted in any direction with one or both hands (never with the fist).
  3. A player cannot run with the ball. The player must throw it from the spot on which he catches it, allowance to be made for a man who catches the ball when running at a good speed if he tries to stop.
  4. The ball must be held in or between the hands; the arms or body must not be used for holding it
  5. No shouldering, holding, pushing, tripping, or striking in any way the person of an opponent shall be allowed; the first infringement of this rule by any player shall count as a foul, the second shall disqualify him until the next goal is made, or, if there was evident intent to injure the person, for the whole of the game, no substitute allowed.
  6. A foul is striking at the ball with the fist, violation of Rules 3,4, and such as described in Rule 5.
  7. If either side makes three consecutive fouls, it shall count a goal for the opponents (consecutive means without the opponents in the mean time making a foul).
  8. A goal shall be made when the ball is thrown or batted from the grounds into the basket and stays there, providing those defending the goal do not touch or disturb the goal. If the ball rests on the edges, and the opponent moves the basket, it shall count as a goal.
  9. When the ball goes out of bounds, it shall be thrown into the field of play by the person first touching it. In case of a dispute, the umpire shall throw it straight into the field. The thrower-in is allowed five seconds; if he holds it longer, it shall go to the opponent. If any side persists in delaying the game, the umpire shall call a foul on that side.
  10. The umpire shall be judge of the men and shall note the fouls and notify the referee when three consecutive fouls have been made. He shall have power to disqualify men according to Rule 5.
  11. The referee shall be judge of the ball and shall decide when the ball is in play, in bounds, to which side it belongs, and shall keep the time. He shall decide when a goal has been made, and keep account of the goals with any other duties that are usually performed by a referee.
  12. The time shall be two 15-minute halves, with five minutes’ rest between.
  13. The side making the most goals in that time shall be declared the winner. In case of a draw, the game may, by agreement of the captains, be continued until another goal is made.

Note: Basketball was originally two words and these original rules were published January 15, 1892 in the Springfield College school newspaper, The Triangle.

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